Martial Arts - Early Days in the U.S.

Wally earning his Black Belt
Ed Parker
John Nativdad
Bong Soo Han

The Insiders
Kick Boxing Promoter
Hockey Gets A Kick

Wally earned his Black Belt in Tang Soo Do and a Black belt in Tae KwanDo.  Wally's Black Board was some of the biggest names in Karate, Byong Yu, Mitz Yamashita, Vic Martinov (president Tang Soo Do Assoc and 8th degree balck belt) Jerry Taylor and Chuck Norris.

 Wally doing forms250x360.jpg  

sparing250x310.jpg

 Wally doing Forms for his Black belt

 Wally Sparring

 Breaking Boards300x213.jpg  Flying Side Kick300x236.jpg
Wally breaking boards for His Black Belt  Wally Doing a Flying Side Kick
 BlackBeltBoard -C300x195.gif  Byong Yu - Wally300x237.jpg
Wally's Black Belt Board: Byong Yu, Mitz Yamashita, Vic Martinov (president Tang Soo Do Assoc and 8th degree balck belt) Jerry Taylor and Chuck Norris Wally and Byong Yu, Tae Kwan Do Grand Master
 TadashiYamasita250x308.gif  

TaeKwonDoGrandMstr250x309.gif

Tadashi Yamashita, Weapons Grand Master

Byong Yu, Tae Kwan Do Grand Master

Vic and Wally300x384.jpg

KathyCarver250x202.jpg

Vic Martinov and Wally
Vic is the highest ranking Tang Soo Do Black belt in the U.S.
Wally, Kathy Garver, Chuck Norris and AAU Olympic Official. Fund raiser for the 1972 U.S. Olympic team

Group1975-450x327.gif
(Right to left) Wally Emery, Linda Lee (widow of Bruce Lee) Bong Soo Han (pioneer movie martial artist stunt double for Tom Laughlin in Billie Jack), Jeff Smith (1975 Champion) Jun Rhee,
Curtis Wong (Publisher Inside Kung Fu Magazine)

Wally earning his Black Belt
Ed Parker
John Nativdad
Bong Soo Han

The Insiders
Kick Boxing Promoter
Hockey Gets A Kick

Ed Parker
EdParkerImage232x300.gifEd Parker is one of America's foremost Karate Pioneers. He is the undisputed "Father" of American Karate having opened the first Karate studio in 1954. His credits include many other firsts, such as the first ...
• To conduct a Karate class on a university campus
• Faculty member to teach Karate on a university campus
• Authentic Karate technical advisor for T.V. and movies in the U.S.
• To publish a Rule Booklet specifically for Karate free-style competition, plus many others.

He is a. native of Honolulu, Hawaii and a graduate of Kamehameha High School. He also graduated from the Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah where he obtained a B.S. degree In Sociology and Psychology.

As Ed Parker learned Karate in Hawaii, he realized the need for new innovations to combat modem day methods of fighting. To fulfill this need, he has developed revolutionary concepts and theories that are practical—not classical. As a result, his innovative concepts and ideas have enhanced the Martial Arts in America.

Upon graduating from the B.Y.U., he moved to California in September of 1956 to establish his second school. Within two years, he was teaching many well-known entertainment personalities through the efforts of his very close friend, Terry Robinson.
 
In 1961 Time Magazine referred to Ed Parker as the "High Priest and Prophet of the Hollywood sect." He has taught such notables as Elvis Presley, Robert Wagner, Blake Edwards, Robert Culp, Robert Conrad, McDonald Carey, Dairin McGavin, Jose Ferrar, George Hamilton, Warren Beatty, Fabian, Rick Jason, Dick Martin, EIke Sommers, Joe Hyams, Bronislaw Kaper, Joey Bishop, Nick Adams, Audie Murphy, Frank Lovejoy, and many others.
 
Quoting Black Belt Magazine, "Many Kenpo stylists refer to Ed Parker as the  last word on the proper way to do their techniques" (February, 1975). Similar praise for Ed Parker appeared in a special issue of Inside Kung-Fu commemorating 20 years of Karate in America; "You don't become the Father of American Karate by being the second in line ... Universally acknowledged as the  man who introduced Karate to America some twenty years ago, Ed Parker has been one of the most innovative and successful influences in the development of the Art in its new environment" (May, 1974).
 
Today Ed Parker has schools throughout the United States, Ireland, Germany, Guatemala, and Chile with many second and third generation offsprings west of the Mississippi.

In addition to authoring three books, Kenpo Karate, Secrets of Chinese Karate and A Women's Guide to Self-Defense, he has published several teaching manuals for students.

Ed parker's Book How to use Nunachakus

Personal note to Wally from Ed Parker

Ed Parker's Instructional Manual
use of Nunchaku

Note to Wally from Ed Parker
11-24-75

Ed Parker

Ed Parker and Wally Emery

Ed Parker
Elvis Pressley's Personal Karate Trainer - Ed Parker

Ed Parker and Wally Emery 1975


Wally earning his Black Belt
Ed Parker
John Nativdad
Bong Soo Han

The Insiders
Kick Boxing Promoter
Hockey Gets A Kick

John NatividadJohn Natividad
"But my God shall supply all your need according to his riches in Glory by Christ Jesus"  Phillippians 4:19

John Natividad was a world-rated karate fighter before his retirement from competition in 1975. He appeared in the Top 10 polls of such publications as Black Belt and Professional Karate. His biggest year was 1973, when he won grand championship titles at the International Championships, the Colorado State Championships, Yamashita Open, Northern California Karate Championships and first places at the Las Vegas Nationals and the Black Belt Team Championships in Washington, D.C. He also owns first-place and grand championship trophies from the '72 Western States Championships, '72 Las Vegas Nationals, '71 Four Seasons, '71 Pasadena AOpen, '72 Pacific Coast Team Invitational, '71 California State Team Championships, '71 Four Seasons Fall Team Championships, '70 International Team Championships, and the 1970 Mike Stone All-Star Team championships in California where he burst into the national spotlight by defeating the top 5 National ranked competitors, most notable were Whirlwind Fred Wren, Victor Moore from New York, and Joe Lewis. That night earned him the title of "Giant Killer". He finished second in the heavyweight division of the World Pro/Am in '70, second in middleweight at the '72 Top 10 Nationals in St. Louis and '72 Grand Nationals in Alburquerque.

John NatividadJohn was a member of Chuck Norris' Championship team with Bob Alegria, Victor Guerrerao, Ralph Alegria and Dennis Young, which fought all over the United States and went undefeated for 7 years. This team fought the Japanese karate team lead by Halliburton in San Jose California and also fought and defeated the Jhoon Rhee team lead by Jeff Smith in Washington, D.C..

The 1973 fight between John Natividad and Benny "The Jet" Urquidez was one of the greatest non-contact bouts in history at the famous finals of Ed Parker's Long Beach Internationals. Natividad beat Urquidez 13-12 in overtime using a technique that Benny had shown him two weeks earlier. Most of the top fighters were part of Southern California Professional Karate Association under Mike Stone and they trained and fought each other, exchanging ideas and often using each others techniques against one another.

Born in Hawaii just outside of Honolulu of chinese and filipino decent, John went to Germany at the age of 14 with his father, during his fathers tenure in the service. After returning from traveling and studying in Europe, at the age of nineteen, John began studying Tang Soo Do with Chuck Norris, and received his black belt from Mr. Norris in 1970.

In 1975 John was one of the first martial artists to utilize books to help with the study of self defense at home.

John was part of the movie documentary “New Gladiators” financed by Elvis Presley. The film follows a team of five American fighters who took on the challenge of the best karate fighters in the world. The film was shot over a year and a half period. Team members included John Natividad, Darnell Garcia, Tom Kelly, Ron Marchini and Benny Urquidez. Ed Parker, Elvis's instructor, and George Waite, a well known karate practitioner, entrepreneur, and friend of Elvis’s, led this team. The team traveled to England, Belgium and Germany competing their top karate teams. The United States Championship Karate Team, as they were called won every team event they fought.

John was also featured in the 2002 television show, Modern Warriors, which was a behind the scenes look into the world of martial arts masters, where over 80 of the world's greatest martial artists, including Hapkido Grand Master Bong Soo Han, demonstrated techniques and discussed philosophy. The program had rare footage of some of the world's greatest kick boxers such as JOHN NATIVIDAD, BENNY "THE JET" URQUIDEZ, DON "THE DRAGON WILSON AND BILL "SUPERFOOT" WALLACE. Commentary is by some of the top stars of No-Holds-Barred including RORION GRACIE, MARK KERR, KEITH HACKNEY and BAS RUTTEN. Modern Warriors shows the stars training and analyzes their techniques and discusses competitions such as K-1. It also discusses the differences in the sports styles and the spiritual styles of martial arts.

John received the Golden Fist Award, Karate’s answer to the Oscar, given by Mike Stone, for Best Offensive Fighter and Technician from 1972 to 1974. He has been inducted into the INTERNATIONAL KARATE AND KICKBOXING HALL OF FAME and the MASTERS HALL OF FAME.

In the early eighties, John took over Chuck Norris' second school in Redondo Beach, the school where the champions had trained. He opened a second school in Culver City where he worked with gang members, giving them an alternative to gangs. John moved to Las Vegas to finish his education, delving into pre-law. There he opened another school and called it John Natividads World Class Karate and Kickboxing Association, the name used by his schools today. In a 1990 issue of Black Belt Magazine, Chuck Norris choose John Natividad as one of the top 20 Fighters in his United Fighting Arts Federation. John has affiliate schools in California and he continues giving martial arts seminars and teaching privately.

RANK, ORGANIZATIONS and BOARDS:

Western Tang Soo Do Federation
Board Member of East West Keno Association for Professor Bob Jones
Board Member of I.I.I.A studio for Dan Sawyer
Board of Advisors USADOJO.COM for Dana Stamos
Member BKF with Master ranking under Grandmaster Steve Mohammed
Master ranking in Emery Childress's Chi-Haw Tae Kwon Do
Board Member of Pacific Rim Tournament
United Martial Artists for Christ

Visit John Natividad's website to learn more about John.

Wally earning his Black Belt
Ed Parker
John Nativdad
Bong Soo Han

The Insiders
Kick Boxing Promoter
Hockey Gets A Kick

Los Angeles Times - OC Sunday January 14, 2007

Bong Soo Han, 73; grand master of hapkido won film fans for martial arts

By JOCELYN Y. STEWART
Times Staff Writer

In 1971 the American public knew little about the martial art known as hapkido. Bong Soo Han200x224.gifThen came the movie "Billy Jack" and an unforgettable performance by a then-unknown martial arts instructor, Bong Soo Han.
 
Standing nearly nose to nose with one of the movie's villains, Han, a stunt double for Tom Laughlin, the movie's star, delivers a quick kick to the man's jaw, flooring him. "Billy Jack" received mixed reviews from critics, but such scenes captured the imagination of the moviegoing public and sent some out seeking to learn the art.
  
Those early students found Han at his dojang, or studio, in Santa Monica, as did thousands of others. For the rest of his life, he taught and promoted the martial art through his International Hapkido Federation, earning recognition as the father of hapkido in the Western world.
  
Han died Monday at his home in Santa Monica from complications of cancer, said Jon Davis, a spokesman for the family. He was 73.
   
"He was, for me, the quintessential martial artist," said Joe Hyams, an author and longtime friend. "Master Han always handled his role as a grand master with a really profound sense of who he was and what he represented. He was an inspiration for his students."

Born Aug. 25, 1933, in On Chun, near Seoul in what is now South Korea, Han was the youngest of five children. His parents, In Suk Han and Hee Suk Han, made their living farming. During Japan's occupation of Korea, Han studied the Japanese martial arts kendo and judo in school. Later he earned a black belt in an art known as kwon bup. During the Korean War, he put his study of martial arts on hold and fought with the army.
  
After his discharge, Han was in Seoul one day and observed Young Sul Qioi performing a demonstration of hapkido, which has been described as the "art of coordinated inner strength."

Hapkido incorporates powerful kicking techniques and fluid throwing. It is based on the water principles of yielding, circular motion and penetration.

"I was most impressed by its flowing, effortless movements," Han said in an interview with Martial Arts & Combat Sports magazine in 2001.  "Instead of clashing, there were redirection and circular motion ... the way of natural movements."
  
Han became a student of Choi, considered one of Korea's best fighting masters, then entered a Buddhist monastery to further develop his martial arts knowledge. In his early days as a teacher, Han trained Korean military personnel and police, as well as Green Berets in the U.S. Army's Special Forces.

Han moved to the United States in 1967, hoping to spread hapkido in the West.  "In order to spread out all over the world, you have to come to the biggest and most powerful nation," he said in a 1984 interview.

On July 4, 1969, Han gave a demonstration at a park in Pacific Palisades. Laughlin was in the audience that day and later became one of Han's students. Though Laughlin performed much of his own stunt work in "Billy Jack," Han performed the more advanced techniques and choreographed fight scenes.
   
"I saw that and thought, 'Boy, oh, boy. That's great,' and I went over to Han's dojang and enrolled," said Hyams, a martial artist who wrote "Zen in the Martial Arts," which explores the teachings of Han and others.

"Billy Jack" led to other film  work, with Han appearing in or coordinating fight scenes in  "Force Five," "Kentucky Fried  Movie" and "Cleopatra Jones," among others.

Han married and later divorced Christen Oh. He is survived by their two children, daughter Susan Han and son Tad Han, both of Santa Monica. In addition, Han is survived by a sister, Ok Su Han of Santa Monica, and son-in-law Kevin Riley of Santa Monica, whom Han considered a son.
 
Since he opened his first school in the 1960s, Han's teachings have spread through his International Hapkido Federation, which now consists of nine affiliated schools.

Though his students might have gone to him with the goal of fighting, Han taught them the spiritual and mental dimensions of martial arts.

The most important thing Han was taught was "to know oneself as a human being," he once said. The most important thing he could teach a student, he said, was "the perfection of character." In decades of teaching thousands of students, Han promoted only about 100 to black belt. "He held very high standards. It didn't come easy," Davis said.

The teacher could throw a 250-pound man easily, yet he was gentle. A charismatic figure, he radiated confidence, calm and security and set an example for what students could obtain through the study of martial arts, Hyams said. Han, a grand master, held the rank of 9th Dan Black Belt.
  
"There's a samurai maxim: 'A man who's attained mastery of his art reveals it in his every action,'" Hyams said. "And he was a master of his art."

Wally earning his Black Belt
Ed Parker
John Nativdad
Bong Soo Han

The Insiders
Kick Boxing Promoter
Hockey Gets A Kick

The following is an article from INSIDE KUNG-FU, vol. 1. no. 9 August 1974.

THE INSIDERS


When Wally Emery resigned his post as President and General Manager of Chuck Norris Karate studios, he didn’t intend to remain in the manager-consultant field. Truthfully, he wasn’t sure exactly what he was going to do; but he was certain of one thing; during his tenure, the Norris organization more than doubled in size, making it the largest karate studio chain on the West Coast. 
                                                                    
Soon afterwards, he began receiving calls from the many friends and associates in the martial arts asking for his advise on one thing or another, mostly business.  And before he knew it their friends were calling too.  Convinced that there was a need for this type of service, he established United Karate, Incorporated – the first martial arts consulting firm.

Since one of the original aims of UKI was to preserve Karate’s venerable traditions and philosophies. Emery spent months interviewing prospective personnel.  He was careful to select those who possessed not only the necessary business acumen, but martial arts background as well, it was worth it.  “This has been very rewarding” he emphasizes.  “Because not only have I created a corporation, but I’m providing jobs for people who respect and uphold the spirit of martial arts”. 

On a strictly commission basis what UKI does for the studio owner is quite simple.  It assumes complete responsibility for all administrative, clerical, advertising, licensing, graphic and promotional choices; sp the instructor can devote as much time as humanly possible to that which he does best teaching. Because, in Emery’s words “It’s an honor to be given the opportunity to pass the art on and the mundane concerns shouldn’t get in the way.  Martial artists are no different from any other artists. They have something of value to offer.  They deserve to be compensated for it.  I think that martial artists should be allowed to make a decent living doing what they enjoy”.  As an afterthought, “You can certainly see the value in that?”  Wally Emery’s just the man to head such a company.  A Black Belt in the Korean art of Tang Soo Do, chairman of the Public Relations Committee of the AAU, and a former Mr. Universe runner-up. And his business credentials are also in order:   William Norris Agency; Associate producer for Mickey Rooney; owned his own film company {with the late Harold Lloyd Jr.}: Divisional manager for European Health Spas, in addition to the Norris position – because his businessman’s savvy is tempered by a martial artist’s sensitivity. “I’m moved by the sincere dedication of my client’s.  I take a great deal of pride in being associated with martial artists; people who are bound by this code and spirit.”

Just what is this “spirit” that Wally Emery alludes to so often?  “Practicing a martial art teaches discipline, one of the most important qualities one can possess.  Discipline can be applied not only in training, but in one’s personal and business life as well. You also develop humility and tenacity.  And those qualities, combined with discipline, will help you in any endeavor you may pursue.

You can certainly see the value in that.

Wally earning his Black Belt
Ed Parker
John Nativdad
Bong Soo Han

The Insiders
Kick Boxing Promoter
Hockey Gets A Kick

Wally Emery, top Kick Boxing Promoter in the seventies, first and last promoter to stage full contact fight at the Fabulous Forum in Los Angeles, the home of the Los Angeles Lakers and the Los Angeles Kings. 

USAvsJapan250x356.gifWally has produced several world title fights and was the first to promote the world title fight at the Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas, NV.  He was the first to bring the fighters from Japan for this world title event.

File0011.jpg

 

 

 

Wally earning his Black Belt
Ed Parker
John Nativdad
Bong Soo Han

The Insiders
Kick Boxing Promoter

The following is an article from INSIDE KUNG-FU, vol. 3. no. 3 March 1976.

HOCKEY GETS A KICK
by Rocco Zappia Jr.

Wally Emery's contributions to the martial arts should not go unnoticed. He hasHockey1-300x261.gif succeeded in putting on a full contact contest at the fabulous Forum, which brought in over four thousand enthusiastic spectators. The important thing to note here is that this was a first in Forum history, never before has a promoter been able to hold such an event at the Inglewood home of the Los Angeles Lakers Basketball team, and Los Angeles King Hockey Team. The event was one of the better organized tournaments of the season with such superstar sport figures as former Ram football great Lester Josephson as the host for the evening. The front rows were also filled with many sports figures in Basketball and Ice Hockey.   With this kind of athletic comradary Emery hopes to professionalize the Martial Arts.   With the continued cooperation of pro athletes and the support of the general public it would seem that Emery's goal is closer than it might seem.   An example of Emery's dedication to the art is his close work with professional athletes.

In recent years Martial Arts have made their way into the locker rooms and training camps of many different types of sports, from baseball to football. Athletes of various sports have taken up martial arts for a variety of reasons. The primary one being to stay in shape. Today's athletes are more physical fit conscious because of the increased competition each season.   In seeking out the best methods of staying in shape many have   found martial arts training to be the   answer.
    
One area of athletics where martial arts’ training has proven effective is in the sport of Ice Hockey. The Los Angeles Kings Hockey Club has been using various exercise techniques for pulled muscles.  The man responsible for this is physical Instructor and Promoter Wally Emery, Emery explains his involvement with the Kings. "I'm the physical instructor for the team and a man by the name of John Holmes is their physical trainer.

John and I got together this past summer to work on the problem of a young Hockey2-250x315.gifplayer named Vie Venasky. We started him on a progressive stretching exercise program to correct a severe groin problem that he's had for a couple of years. The end result is that his elasticity has immensely improved and according to his coach he's playing better now than in past seasons. I think that the stretching exercises that karate students practice in the dojos is a tremendous benefit to pro athletes and I think that the stretching itself with the hockey players that I work with."
  
Emery's qualifications as a physical instructor speak for themselves. He is an accomplished black belt in the Korean arts of Tang Soo Do and Tae Kwon Do. Emery is also a former runner up in both the Mr. Universe and Mr. Europe contests. "It was very difficult for me when I first started out in the Martial Arts," states Emery, "primarily because my muscles were very tight. I therefore had to work extra hard on stretching in order to attain better elasticity. As far as the hockey players are concerned I found that by helping them achieve elasticity it eliminated a lot of the muscle strains and impact that hockey players are prone to get.  That little extra half inch of stretching ability might save a severe muscle tear. The reason that I suggested this is because of my physical therapy background." Emery, while in the service, attended medical field service at Fort Sam Houston and on for more schooling in Europe.

During the 23 day training period I have the team start by running, this warms up the total body. The next step is a series of stretching exercises which LAKings225x229.gifinclude Chinese splits, which is an exercise where the body is forward, and the legs are spread apart on both sides of the body. After about 15 minutes of stretching, I bring the team into the weight room.  This is where they go through upper body development. Also I teach them abdominal exercises to tighten and strengthen stomach muscles.  Emery stresses that although hockey is a rough sport martial arts training does not promote violence.    "The first point is player injuries, if we can avoid major injuries like severe muscle strains, tears, etc., then we're naturally going to have a better team at the end of the season.  This is our primary approach, our secondary approach is to have the player be more effective on the ice."  These are some of the goals that Emery is trying to achieve with the Los Angeles Kings. Another project that he is working on is professionalizing the martial arts. "We want to make the art respected by the public in general. There are some twenty million American people that I really think need the Martial Arts. Whether it's for self-confidence, physical fitness, self defense or whatever, I think that one can benefit highly from the martial arts."

Physical trainer, John Holmes, of the Kings discusses how Emery's techniques have benefited the team. "When I first met Wally we discussed the exercise program that Karate people go through.  Upon seeing and experiencing the program I felt that it could effectively be applied to the players for various muscle problems that occur throughout the season.  In the case of Vic Venasky, who had groin problems and hernia operations, there's no question in my mind that Emery's Karate exercise techniques gave him the ability to vastly improve his game.  There is also a self-confidence thing whereby it's being instilled in his head through the art.  I feel that the mental aspect of it is as important as the physical.  Venasky is now in a situation where his threshold of pain is higher than it was in the past.  Due to the tremendous effect that Wally's exercises have had on the team we are definitely going to continue with it in the future."

The training camp period in hockey lasts only about twenty three days. During this short time the team might play as many as ten exhibition games.  With such a fast pace exhibition schedule the players obviously have to be in top shape.  This is why Holmes stresses so heavily the idea of the player elasticity.  Holmes' personal involvement with the martial arts are proven to be effective in his own health. "While playing on the ice," explains Holmes. "I was rammed into a goal post.  I had four operations and spent two hundred and twenty one days in one year in the hospital.  I was told at that time not to engage in any physical activity at all, which was very frustrating. Therefore 1 too, along with the team, worked with Wally in the stretching exercise program.  I appreciated the special attention that Wally gave me, as it was a very difficult time in my life. There is no doubt that Wally Emery and the Martial Arts have brought me to my present physical plateau."

Wally earning his Black Belt
Ed Parker
John Nativdad
Bong Soo Han

The Insiders
Kick Boxing Promoter
Hockey Gets A Kick
Chuck Norris - The Early Days
Return to Health and Fitness Success Story

©copyright all rights reserved on all web pages